Liver Cancer Lesions

Cancer of the bladder is not one of neoplastic disease, but a group of various cancers of different histologic patterns with different natural histories and pathologic behaviors. As a consequence of the above, different forms of trea 00004000 tment become necessary, depending upon different individual circumstances. Apart from the biologic behavior tendencies of cancer of the bladder, another unique characteristic is that the bladder serves the essential function of storage of urine so that if it becomes necessary to sacrifice the bladder by surgery, provision for urinary storage must be made. To date all such provisions are makeshifts.

Furthermore, cancer of the bladder, apart from threatening the patient’s health and existence by local extension and distant metastases, is potentially lethal through secondary effect of damaging kidney function by ureteral obstruction with concomitant infection. And finally, not only recurrences of the original tumor, but the occurence of other tumors from oci, represent another undesirable characteristic.
For many years bladder tumors have been classified on the basis of their cystoscopic appearance. There are the multiple, small, benign papillary type of tumor which should be regarded as a Grade I carcinoma, for eventually these tumors may become invasive. Next there is the second type of tumor with a broad base and cauliflower-like appearance which is a malignant papilloma and usually infiltrating. Then there is the third type, an ulcerative lesion, which is quite frequently a squamous cell carcinoma.

Recently it has been suggested that all bladder tumors should be classified, not upon their appearance under the microscope, but rather upon the extent of their invasion through the wall of the bladder:
1.Those growing superficially on the bladder mucosa.
2.those that have become invasive and the invasion has been limited to the tunica propria.
3.those that have invaded into the muscular wall of the bladder.
4.those that have invaded all the way through the wall of the bladder and finally,
5.those with metastatic growth outside the bladder.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    Pancreatic cancer = Liver lesions?
    My Mother in law survived Pancreatic Cancer back in 2007. She’s been in remission ever since the surgery in December ’07. She goes every 3 months for an MRI to make sure there is nothing new. In January she passed with flying colors. She went in this past Tuesday for the next 3 month MRI and they told her yesterday that they found 2 lesions on her liver, one was 1 cm and the other was 1.6 cm.

    My question is, what are the chances that something could have popped up now after everything has been clear? She did have a horrible viral infection back in February, and I’ve read online that lesions can be caused by a viral infection but we won’t know until she gets a PET scan done sometime soon.

    Is she more at risk for this to be cancer due to having had pancreatic cancer? She had a modified whipple procedure done where they removed the area on her pancreas that was infected, some of her stomach, her intestine and her gall bladder/bile duct. They also took biopsies of her lymph nodes to see if she had any cancerous cells and of the 24 that they took, 3 did so they gave her a long round of chemo and radiation therapy.
    Thanks, but I already know about pancreatic cancer…

    • ANSWER:
      The honest answer to your question is that the liver lesions very well could be cancer. I suppose the MRI has ruled out that they could be simple cysts? They have been there the whole time, but it has taken them about 1½ years to become large enough to be visible on MRI. They are probably resistant to the chemo given earlier. A major risk factor (apart from the fact that she had pancreatic cancer) is that 3 of the removed lymph nodes harbored metastases. But that doesn’t mean that there are no treatment options. I´m not knowledgeable enough to tell you exactly what those treatment options are, but this is a discussion she will have with her oncologist (if the lesions turn out to be metastases).

  2. QUESTION:
    If you have lesions in the stomach & liver, does that mean you have cancer?
    My dad has been admitted to hospital & has been in for over a week now but he isn’t letting on too much information about his condition. He has told me he has hep c & has had that for 20 yrs now, he also has lesions on his liver & in his stomach.
    He perforated his stomach approx 15 yrs ago & cut down his drinking habits then but slowing began drinking more with the result of more internal bleeding, leading to his hospital stint. My question is does he have cancer too?

    • ANSWER:
      The medical term “lesion” denotes any irregular tissue structure. It could be scarring, benign growth, or malignant (cancerous) growth.

      Your father’s doctor will diagnose his condition through medical imaging and other appropriate tests. The doctor will then offer a treatment plan.

      You really need to speak with your parents about this matter, but be aware that they may be under great stress right now. Speak with them in a mature and constructive manner that makes you an asset to the family.

      Best wishes that your Dad has a good outcome.

  3. QUESTION:
    Aunt just diagnosed with breast cancer now liver lesions?
    My 42 yo aunt has just been diagnosed with breast cancer thru a biopsy its came back as a stage 23 grade 2.So they did a PET SCAN when they go the results back the doctor said everything came back clear except her liver had some spots that looked suspicious so they are now going to do a liver biopsy.Could this be cancer to? If so how if her lymp nodes came back clear ?how could it have spread? What else could it be???Iam freaking out here worried sick I just want her to be better and this waiting and not knowing is killing us!!Also IM confused cause she had her yearly mammogram 10 only 10 months ago!?

    • ANSWER:
      mine went to my liver and uterus even though my lymph nodes were clear,i have 5 large tumours on my liver and was given 3 to 4 months to live last march, but my doc threw everything he could at me and a lot more to come but he reckons i could see my grandchild being born in sept, (my first by my only daughter), and even my 50th birthday next jan, because he shrunk the tumours so much, what i am trying to say is, if they can shrink my big buggers then think what they can do with your aunts spots. positive thinking really helps, and it may not be cancer, she`s is lucky to have people who love her. hope her results are good x

  4. QUESTION:
    Regarding the question posted about “cancer terminology” in regards to liver cancer?
    I just read a post that someone is trying to clear up the term lesion. I ask this because I’m wondering if this is how liver cancer is detected, would one of the many symptoms of liver cancer be lesions shown in an ultrasound? Lucikly for me, I too did have an ultrasound for my liver but they found no lesions

    • ANSWER:
      Ultrasound is one way but MRI,CT scans work well also

  5. QUESTION:
    liver cancer?
    Can a person have cancer in the liver when blood test for liver comes back normal? I have lesions, need biopsy and am considering not having it done.
    Thanks for the advice so far, but honestly cancer in the liver is pretty much fatal. If it’s there, it’s there. I don’t want to go through a biopsy again. Had one in a different spot toward the end of last year. I’m drained.

    • ANSWER:
      Please go have the tests immediately,this is your life you are dealing with.

  6. QUESTION:
    My aunt had surgery for her colon cancer, but now there’s cancer lesions on her liver. Is it curable?
    She’s in a hospice program for the terminally ill because they say there is no cure for colon cancer. If there was no cure, what is the chemotherapy for?

    How much time does she have left?

    http://www.webmd.com/colorectal-cancer/guide/treatment-stage?page=2

    This site says the 5-year survival rate for Dukes D Colon Cancer is about 8%.

    Does that mean only 8% of the people live past five years?

    • ANSWER:
      Unfortunately, if you’re aunt has lesions in her liver, then her cancer is most likely incurable. It means that it has metastasized (spread from her bowel to liver). The reason they are offering chemotherapy is that chemo can be used even in palliative patients to slow progression, but primarily to reduce symptoms. i.e. If someone has a cancer in their throat that has spread to their liver, chemo may be offered to slow the growth of the cancer in their throat so they can continue to eat alone without the aid of medical devices.

      Your interpretation of the 5 year survival rate is correct.

  7. QUESTION:
    liver cancer- if you dont KNOW dont try to answer?
    female 23
    numerous liver lesions

    total liver failure
    mass in stomach

    talking to her about resuscitation preferences

    is there a stop gap method for for liver failure?

    would they transplant if , if cancer is present and its a large tumor?
    ok there are lots debate in within YA, however obviously my daughter is dieing and I would have thought just a small amout of humanity would have suggested you lay off over this question

    • ANSWER:
      Agree with Denisedd- sounds more like gastric cancer with liver spread (metastases). Has either the liver or stomach mass been biopsied? If this is metastatic disease, transplant is not an option. Outside of treatment for the primary cancer, the liver failure will not get better; furthermore the liver failure creates many problems with administering the treatment in the first place, so starting treatment may not even be an option. There really is no other stop-gap measure here. I am truly sorry to not have more positive advice. A biopsy needs to be done though- if it is lymphoma, then this suddenly becomes a completely different (and much better) problem.
      Blessings

  8. QUESTION:
    Liver lesions…what is the prognoses?
    My mother in law had breast cancer about 4 years ago, she then had a breast reconstruction.

    Recently she’s been diagnosed with liver lesions and needs chemotheraphy.

    Has anyone known someone close to them that has had liver cancer? What is the prognoses?

    My husband and I are pregnant with out first child, and first Grandchild for my mother in law, I really want our child to grow up knowing her, what are the chances???

    Thank you in advance for your answers.

    • ANSWER:
      Not very good I’m afraid. She may be fairly limited in her time unless they have got the liver lesions at an early stage

  9. QUESTION:
    I have a question about liver lesions, just like “scared.”?
    I am a 49 year old female, have been having problems that sound like gallbladder to everybody that I talk to. I have had an ultrasound, and they called me saying I need a ct scan because they saw “abnormalities” which are lesions on my liver. They think they are most likely hemangioma, which are benign, but of course I’m terrified. I’m always healthy, this is the first health problem I’ve ever really had. Wondering if at my age I should be scared that it is liver cancer, it is all over the internet. A couple of older members of my family have had cancer, but not anything like liver that I know of. I am having pain in my shoulders after eating, some queasiness with greasy or fatty food, and some diarrhea. Sounds like gallbladder, which I will have tested, but doctor’s don’t get in any hurry! it takes a few weeks to get things done. Anyway, anybody know anything about these lesions? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      I am a 30 year female and have lesions on my liver too. Mine are from being on birth control for 10 years. Don’t let this worry you too much until they do some more test.. I asked to not biopsy mine just yet.. so we are watching it to see if it grows.. Time will tell my dear and if you are a healthy women with no other signs it may just be there like mine.. I know its scary they found mine in the ER during a cat scan.. Took a week till anyone called me back.. So I proceeded to call and call until they could give me some answers. I wish you well and are praying for you..I found a lot of help on Web MD.. What is on my liver may never go away but may also never do any damage on less it gets bigger. The only thing for me is that can no longer take any kind of hormones. (which will stink during those hot flashes yet to come).

  10. QUESTION:
    Lesions on the liver and pancreas?
    It may be a case of cancer. Has anyone here been treated for liver cancer and what does the treatment entail. Thankyou.

    • ANSWER:
      My sister is a liver cancer survivor, her treatment was a liver transplant (outside the US) and chemo

  11. QUESTION:
    How commonly are lesions of the liver benign?
    I was in hospital before christmas with kidney stones: CT scans revealed that I have largeish lesions on my liver, which the CT could not identify, so am going in for an MRI tomorrow. I’m obviously nervous and hoping I’ll be told I’m fine and can just go home, no worries. So I’m just wondering what other people’s experiences of this are – is liver cancer common when lesions are a symptom? And do benign lesions require surgery? I’m already booked in for cytoscopy for the kidney stone, and would really like to avoid further surgery!!

    Anyone else out there in the same boat??

    • ANSWER:
      50% chance of either.
      Best of luck.

  12. QUESTION:
    my mother in law is 6o years old has smoked for years and has type 2 diabetes, has she got liver cancer?
    she has been told after numerous tests that she has lesions on her liver and some on her lung the docs have told her that there is huge chance of cancer. she looks to me to be slightly jaundice and has fluid build up in her ankles and feet has loss of appetite. does anyone have any info or advice on what they think and how advanced it is and if there is anything she can do to slow it we are waiting on results from endoscopy , and praying Any info please????

    • ANSWER:
      I’m sorry Joanne, but it isn’t possible for someone to slow down cancer on their own. She may not have liver cancer as often presents as a solitary lesion. Multiple lesions are more consistent with metastatic disease. Lung mets usually show as multiple lesions as well, most of the time at the base of the lungs. Doctors do not know how to treat her until they know what kind of cancer they are dealing with and it sounds like that is what they are doing now.

  13. QUESTION:
    Secondary liver cancer from the bowel?
    Hello

    I am a 23 year old male, diagnosed with Duke C bowel cancer in may 2008. I had a proctocolectomy to remove the tumor but it spread to the lymph nodes and a recent ultrasound showed mulitple lesions on my liver.
    I am not so concerened whether i live or die but really just how much pain i will experience with or without medicine as i am quite sick to death of hopsitals and am not really happy of the idea of more hospital stays and/or drugs.

    thank you

    • ANSWER:
      This is terrible news and you are far too young to have to deal with it. I am so sorry.

      If you have multiple liver lesions surgery is not going to fix it. It sounds as though you understand the prognosis is not good. I know one can only take so much of doctors and hospitals before you are sick of them. You need to talk to your oncologist about your priorities to make sure your goals are the same and discuss your concerns about pain. Not everyone experiences severe pain. Also, be clear about your objections to drugs. What is it that makes you dislike them? Do they make you nauseous? Fuzzy headed? Sleepy? Your doctor can work with you to give you different or a combination of drugs that are better for you, but they need to know what you don’t like about them first. If and when you are ready hospice really is a good idea. When you feel like it look into a few in your area and talk to them about how they would handle your case. Best wishes.

  14. QUESTION:
    Liver cancer case-last stage- request opinion of expert-can it still be cured?
    My close relative has liver cancer,she is in india, Her last investigation report states
    “A case of Ca. Pancreas with liver metastases”

    Looking for help, if some expert can look at the report and provide his opinion
    1. Is there any hope left? Can it still be cured
    2. If yes, what can help.

    Report
    Clinical Pathology
    —————–
    Sport urinalysis
    Protien 6.7 mg/dl
    Creatinine 150 mg/dl
    UPCR (urine protein: urine creatinine ration) 0.04466 mg/dl

    BIOCHEMISTRY
    —————–
    refrence range
    MAG MagnEsium 2.1 mg/dl 1.7- 2.4
    CAI Calcium total 9.5 mg/dl 9-11
    BSR Blood sugar 90 mg/dl 60-110
    PHQ PHOSPHOROUS 6.8 mg/dl 3-4.5
    quantitative 24 hr

    ABDOMEN
    ————————————————
    Liver(segment 8) > 2.2cm ( 1.2cm in prev study)
    Liver(segment 6) > 1.9 cm ( 1.1cm in prev study)
    Liver(segment 5) > 1.5 cm
    Uncinate process pancreas mass > 3.0cm

    A case of ca. uncinate process of pancreas with liver metastases
    Target lesions in regard to liver metastasis have increased in size as well as number, suggestive of disease progression.

    HEMATOLOGY
    —————————————————
    TLC WBC COUNT 11540 /cumm 4000-10000
    RBC 3.83 million/cmm 3.9- 5.6
    HB 10.9 gm/dl 13.5-18
    HCT 35.3 % 40-54
    MCV 92.2 76-96
    MCH 28.5 pg/ml 27-32
    MCHC 30.9 g/dl 32-36
    platelete count 3.80 lac/cumm 1.5-3.0
    Polymorphs 80 % 40-75
    Lymphocytes 18 % 20-50
    Eosinophils 02 % 1-6
    HEMATOLOGY
    —————————————————
    PROTHROMBIN TIME-PT. 18.1 sec 11-16
    LFT- FOLLOW UP.
    BILRUBIN TOTAL 0.3 MG/DL 0.2-1.2
    ALBUMIN 3.7 gms % 3.2-5.3
    PROTIEN 6.6 gms % 6.2-8.0
    SGOT-AST 29 Iu/L 0-38
    SGPT-ALT 53 Iu/L 0-31
    ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE 475 Iu/L 108-306
    RENEL FUNCTION TEST-RFT.
    ————————————————————
    UREA 30 MG/DL 10-45
    CREATININE 1.1 mg/dl 0.4-1.4
    SODIUM 138 meq/l 136-149
    POTASSIUM 4.7 meq/l 3.5-5.0
    CHLORIDE 102 meq/l 98-108

    • ANSWER:
      She has pancreatic cancer not liver cancer. Surgery for this cancer is very extensive and not an option in 80% of the cases and certainly not for stage 4 disease. I’m sorry to say this is not curable. Her oncologist is the expert and should have explained this.

  15. QUESTION:
    What is the prognosis for metastatic liver cancer in the elderly?
    My father was recently diagnosed with liver cancer, he’s 88. He has multiple lesions on his liver. It is the secondary site – he had a bout of bladder cancer which (we thought) was being successfully managed. He’s been in great shape, good health and very active his entire life. He is not your typical frail elderly person in their 80s. Its hard to see someone who was formerly energetic and vibrant slipping away. They have done ultrasound and CT scan and needle biopsy is next. We are being told by oncologist that treatment options are limited or that he “may not be a good candidate for chemo”, presumably because of his age and I guess b/c of the advanced stage the cancer may be at. Does anyone have any similar experiences? The Internal Medicine Resident who first saw him said “3 months” but she’s not an oncologist so not sure how much weight to put in that. I’ve heard liver cancer has a bad prognosis and is very quick/aggressive. Would be interested to hear about anyone having similar experiences. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      Liver cancer usually does have a poor prognosis, but I’m not so sure that is what he has. If it is a secondary site than it is not liver cancer. Are you saying it’s metastatic bladder cancer? Are they doing a biopsy of the liver? Maybe they are not sure what the primary site is.

  16. QUESTION:
    Colon/ Liver Cancer Question?
    My mum was diagnosed with colon cancer that had spread to her liver 6 months, at the time she was told she had 3-6 months to live. A few weeks later she underwent surgery to have the majority of the tumors in the liver removed.

    She still has a few small lesions on her liver, up at the top and some on the right hand side approx 7/9 – she had 3 months of chemo and once the review came they said it was a ‘mixed response’ some had grown a little- some stayed the same.

    They didn’t do a scan of the bowel, Why is this? As they need the tumor there to shrink to undergo surgery on the bowel/ liver at the same time.

    Another concern is that they always scan her chest to see if it’s clear, I know its a common place for the cancer to break off to- but what is the likely hood and how long would it take?

    Thanks a lot

    • ANSWER:
      The liver is the most common place for colon cancer to spread to. It is a little strange to be given 3-6 months to live and still be doing surgery and chemo. However, she should have had a colon resection before chemo started and if any liver lesions are removed it is usually done then. It is pointless to remove them and leave the cancer in the colon and they usually don’t remove them if there are more than 2-3. If the liver was scanned than the colon was too. It is impossible to know if or when it may spread to the lungs.

  17. QUESTION:
    My 79 year old father-in-law was recently diagnosed with secondary (metastatic) liver cancer.?
    He has multiple lesions on his liver. The doctors have been unable to determine the primary site of the cancer. They “think” it may be the pancreas and have advised that it is sometimes difficult to diagnose cancer in the pancreas. He is bleeding internally and has needed several blood transfusions over the last 6 months. He has lost 35-40 pounds. His ankles are very painful and all the doctors can say is that it is an infection, which they are treating with aggressive intravenous antibiotics. Due to his age and other heath concerns (prior heart attacks), the doctors do not think chemo is possible. He has not been given a prognosis; (no one has asked). Can anyone give me a prognosis of how long he might have?

    • ANSWER:
      It is difficult to treat cancer with chemo when you do not know the primary site. They should be able to tell from a liver biopsy. He should have also had a PET. If this is the only area cancer is seen it will depend on how much his liver is involved. If it is pancreatic cancer the median survival is 2-6 months. If they cannot stop the internal bleeding it will be several days to a few weeks.

  18. QUESTION:
    What is a liver lesion?
    Im a 20 year old male 6′ 170 pounds, healthy and in shape, with no history of cancer in the family and I was told I had a liver “lesion” show up on a CT scan. Is it likely this is cancer? I just joined the army and found this out and im fairly scared that its cancer or something because I dont precisely know what a “lesion” means when discussing the liver and everything Ive searched online with regards to liver lesions comes up liver cancer. What are the chances, with my lack of cancer history in my family, and my age that this is something i should be stressing over? Could prescription drugs that I used to take have caused this? Could an old injury from a fight could have caused it? Thanks for all the help…

    • ANSWER:
      A “liver lesion” could refer to almost anything seen on a CT scan in the liver. That term isn’t descriptive at all. It simply means that there was some kind of spot visible on the scan. There are a multitude of things that could be visualized like this in a CT. One would have to view the scan and know your medical history to start venturing guesses. Hopefully you have a follow up with your doctor, since he or she can give you much more definite answers. Cancer, however, isn’t very common in young adults, so don’t worry too much about that diagnosis at this point. It’s much much more likely to be something else!

  19. QUESTION:
    Liver cirrhosis and liver cancer?
    My husband has just been informed that he has “slight scarring” on the liver and that his liver is enlarged. I have many questions regarding this, but PLEASE, I am looking for serious-minded answers, not for people telling me that he should stop drinking or other kinds of moralizing; it is hard enough as it is. First: the doctor said “there is slight scarring but no sign of cirrhosis”. I don’t quite understand this because I though scarring of the liver IS cirrhosis, although it might be at a very early stage in his case. Also, is an enlarged liver the same thing as fatty liver, or could there be other reasons for it being enlarged? Unfortunately, his main health issue is not the liver but advanced heart failure (severe dilated cardiomyopathy) and also COPD. He was told some years ago that he has Hepatitis C but then it was in a dormant state. Could his Hepatitis C have caused the scarring over time even if it has been in a dormant state? Also, when the scarring has started, is it bound continue? His doctor says that his liver is “working”, although I’m not sure whether she meant that it is working without any problems or working at a diminished capacity. I have done a lot of reading and it seems to me that he has many of the symptoms associated with acute liver failure: itching and small red lesions scattered over his body, a brief (one day) period of yellow skin and vomiting, periods of flu-like symptoms with fever, loss of appetite, severe sleep disturbances, clay-colored stool, brown urine, and his nails have turned very light. Also, he quit smoking, not because of his own determination but because he lost taste for cigarettes, which apparently is a sign of liver failure. He also bruise and bleed very easily, and he is easily fatigued. Many of these symptoms are of course also associated with heart disease, but it seems that they have become worse in the last couple of months. His bleeding and bruising can of course be caused by the heavy doses of coumadin he is on, but it seems that the bruising has gotten worse too. He is also getting easy confused and is becoming more and more forgetful. He is 60 years old. So, this is what I wonder: Can the heart disease and/or the COPD have caused the liver disease, or affect it negatively? And vice versa, what effect does the liver issue have on the heart disease and the COPD? His doctor wrote in the last report that there is no sign of ascites but he keeps saying that he feels very bloated and to me it seems like fluid, not fat. He often complain of discomfort in his lower right side and get winded very easily (also a sign of the heart disease, of course). How serious is this liver problem? If in fact he does have acute liver failure due to Hepatitis C, what is the outlook? I don’t believe liver transplant is an option in his case due to his advanced heart failure and generally poor condition. If it is left untreated and he continues to drink (he has at least 3 beers and usually a couple of shots of hard liquor per day. I am desperately trying to make him stop or seek help, but I am not able to), what is likely to happen? If scar tissue continues to build up in his liver, how dangerous is it and what kind of life expectancy does he have? Is it a matter of decades or years/months before his liver gives in completely? How do people with this kind of disease typically die, slowly by wasting away or suddenly? If it is not acute liver failure, what else could it be? Does the complications of Hepatitis C always come from cirrhosis/scarring caused by it, or can it cause symptoms independently without leading to cirrhosis? And is scarring always a sign of cirrhosis or can there be other reasons for it? If so, how likely is it that the scarring does lead to cirrhosis (unless it is the same disease just at different stages) How great is the risk of developing liver cancer? Is this risk increased because of his generally poor health or is it determined by other factors? Please, please, any information at all would be of great help. I know that all these questions should be directed to his doctor, but my husband refuses to let me meet her, and he himself seems to live in denial and doesn’t want to know anything about his disease. This is my reality, and any information you could provide would be gratefully accepted. Thankyou for reading all the way through this long question.

    • ANSWER:

  20. QUESTION:
    liver ultrasound results…does this mean I don’t have liver cancer?
    i had a liver ultrasound done and it said that it was very fatty. Because of the excess fat, localized lesions can’t be seen clearly but no mass lesions have been detected. Does this mean I do not have a tumor which in turns means no liver cancer?

    I had the ultrasound done because I had elevated liver enzymes so my doctor suspects it to be the liver inflammed from fatty change. But after 3 months of exercising and dietary change my liver enzymes have returned to normal. Please let me know if the terminology from my ultrasound means no liver cancer. Thanks

    • ANSWER:
      If you had liver cancer the doctor would have told you because there would be treatments involved. A fatty liver is more common than most people realize. Question your doctor and make sure that he or she answers all of your questions.

  21. QUESTION:
    liver lesion and blood tests?
    my mom had a blood test done a few months back and the results showed something wrong with her liver. my mom has had arthritis since her 20s and has had numerous joint replacement surgeries. she is on steady pain medication and so they thought it was all the medication taking its toll.

    fast forward. she was having an attack that sounded like it might be her gall bladder and so she went in to have an ultrasound. while they did in fact find gall stones they also found a lesion on her liver.

    she is going back in tomorrow for a more thorough cat scan on her liver and i am worried. most of the research i have done shows that benign lesions on the liver are common and usually nothing to worry about, however, these people also had normal blood tests.

    my question is if anyone out there with medical knowledge can let me know if her blood test showed damage to her liver does this increase the chances that it is cancerous?

    i know there is no way for anyone to tell me “your mom is fine” or “your mom has liver cancer”

    but any personal stories or medical advice would be appriciated.

    i am just scared. my mom’s mom was diagnosed with breast cancer at the same age my mom is now. she lost her battle at 59. i have also lost both of my dad’s parents to cancer so i do not take it lightly.

    i’m not ready to even think about losing my mom.

    • ANSWER:
      First let me say I am sorry to hear about your mother going through a rough patch right now. Ok so they found a lesion on your mothers liver that does not necessarily mean that it is cancer.

      I myself had an ultrasound done on my abdomen a few years ago due to random shooting pains I would get every now and then. While my bladder was normal they found a lump/lesion on my kidney. Granted I had normal blood work numbers (creatine levels were normal) but it really worried me none the less. I had a CT scan performed on my abdomen and they fount it just to be a cyst (dromedary hump) which is a normal variant.

      I am not saying that absolutely nothing is wrong with your mother, but it could be an illness less threatening than cancer. Do not work yourself up until your mother has already received her results. I wish you and your mother the best of luck.

  22. QUESTION:
    Liver Lesion on CT scan?
    My husband has been having gastrointestinal problems (gas, change in bowel habits, constant cramping feeling in upper right quadrant) since Christmas and we always thought he just had a sensitive stomach. It’s gotten progressively as time’s gone on and he went to see an GI. The GI did a HIDA scan, colonoscopy and endoscopy and everything turned out fine. He issued him a prescription for intestinal spasms and left it at that. My husband didn’t want that answer and went back to his family doctor who issued a CT scan. They found a lesion on his liver, unfortunately they did not say where or how big. He’s going to get a MRI done now so we will know more soon. I’ve been trying to look into what causes liver lesions, what all it could be (cyst, tumor, etc) but only one thing keeps popping up and that’s liver cancer. Does anyone have any idea or can you give me more insight? It’s much appreciated.

    • ANSWER:
      My husband had same tests and a lesion was found. He went in for a ct guided biopsy and it was just a hemangioma. Your husband doesn’t even have any symptoms of liver cancer…

  23. QUESTION:
    How can cancer spread without lymph node involvment?
    My aunts lymph nodes came back clear but they found lesions on her liver she has been diagnosed with breast cancer.They are doing a liver biopsy.We have no idea right now if they r cancer or nothing Iam praying they are nothing.But how can cancer spead without lymph node involvment? Whats the possibilty this is just nothing?
    They did blood work came back as non-vascular

    • ANSWER:
      I’m curious what you mean by “they did blood work came back as non-vascular.” The truth is that all tumors have some vasculature or they wouldn’t be able to survive. Tumors feed on the same oxygen and nutrients that the rest of your body feeds on, and more.

      As a result, the cancerous cells can enter the blood stream and travel through the body, coming to rest in other locations. The liver is a prime target for these rogue cells because it works like a filter for the blood.

      The lymphatic system definitely plays a part, but positive nodes do not always precede distant metastases.

  24. QUESTION:
    what is a lesion found on a cancer patient who has prostrate cancer, lymph glands also and hip bone. now it sa?
    the cancer patient has prostrate cancer, with lymph glands also and on hip bone. Now they found lesions on the liver. he was scheduled for surgery to remove everything involved, when the ultrasound picked up the lesions on the liver. Surgery was canceled until they can be cleared for an MRI. What exactly is a lesion? Thanks. Thoms626@verizon.net

    • ANSWER:
      A lesion is an abnormal area in an organ or tissue (it is a nonspecific term for an abnormality). Since the patient has cancer it is likely that the lesion is cancerous.
      Advanced prostate (not prostrate) cancer can metastasize (spread to other organs) making treatment very difficult. If the cancer has spread the treatment will be different than if the cancer was localized to the prostate. Once cancer spreads chemo or radiation is usually necessary in addition to surgery.

  25. QUESTION:
    what is a persons chance of surviving stage 4 colon cancer w/2 lesion on the liver?

    • ANSWER:
      one year–80%
      two year–68%
      three year–52%
      four years and after–below 50%

  26. QUESTION:
    life expectancy w/ stage 4 colon cancer mest to lung and liver?
    I know i’m asking for an ans for which there is no definitive one…here goes. My boyfriend was diagnosed w/colon cancer 4 years ago. had surgery, chemo, radiation, removed large section of colon. 2 years ago and pretty much non-stop, chemo, radiation, then mest to lymph nodes, lungs and liver. had cryo laser surgery done in nov, said was good. but then got lung infection, cea up to 49, 3 weeks later, 156, Jan 2 Cea 250 w/ 15 lesions on liver, excructiating pain, still doing 10 chemo pills ago (not responding). went to er last night, liver’s enlarges, sent him home w/ stronger pain pills (was vicadine, not sure what now) but still has to double up to minimize pain. He’s given up,(is pretty mean) says the doc’s haven’t given him a time frame but told me not to buy him a birthday present (aug). he refuses to talk about it, says it will jsut upset me. I say I have a right to know. help? ideas? timeframe? he’s 55

    • ANSWER:
      Just going by the info given I would say, he is right that he might not see his next birthday. You might do some research on the stages of dying. It sounds like he is in the acceptance stage. It might be helpful for yourself, and allow you to be more of what he needs(not that I’m saying you aren’t right now). I have some training in helping the dying as a “Stephen Minister”. It has been a little while, and I have never actually had a case yet (Thank God), but I do know that there are definitely stages, The loved ones also go through the same stages, but at their own rate, and at times that may not be very helpful if you know what I mean. An example might be that he is in the acceptance stage ,and you might be in the denial or bargaining stage. Anyway this isn’t really what you asked but, I think it will be helpful to you at some point. Maybe there is even some info on-line. Also a hospice maybe able to give you some reading suggestions, maybe even a support group.
      If you attend a church, It maybe that they have a “Stephen ministry program” or if they do not then they might be able to put you in contact with a church that does.
      May God bless you both, and strengthen and comfort you.
      You may e-mail me if you wish.
      EDIT: You do not have to belong to a church or even be a christian to ask for a Stephen Minister.

  27. QUESTION:
    does anyone have experience with bowel cancer which may have spread to the liver,?
    I have a small 1cm lesion in my liver which may or may not be cancer, what might be symptons one might look for

    • ANSWER:
      I have colon cancer with mets to my liver. I have had 5/6ths of my colon removed, and am now awaiting a liver resection. Have you had the primary cancer removed? Did you do radiation or chemotherapy? I had to have a CT, Ultrasound and an MRI for the radiologists to determine that most of the spot in my liver were complex cysts (which can be misdiagnosed as cancer), but I have five spots – which ‘appear’ to be cancer that the chemo has already treated. Since the spots are still visible I am having them removed.
      Are you aware of your CEA level? This is your blood reading that for some people is a good marker to indicate active cancer. If you are not aware of this test, it is likely that your Oncologist would have past records of your readings. You should know what they are and see if it has fluctuated.
      There are no symptoms of tumours in the liver. There is no pain (thankfully).
      Wendy
      www.wendysbattle.com

  28. QUESTION:
    Anyone here with breast cancer metastasis to the liver?
    My aunt was diagnosed and by the time she noticed the lump in her breast it had spread to her liver she has about a dozen lesions on her liver.They haven’t done much with the mass in her breast they have said the main concern is her liver at the moment.She is taking chemo treatments every week and the breast mass has shrunk in size and she is doing well considering.Her blood work has been coming back normal every week except last week her white blood cell count was high and she could not have chemo.Iam wanting to talk to people who has went thru this or is going thru this same situation .What was/is your course of treatment? how are you doing? I know this is serious and would lover more info from someone knowledgeable. Also her breast cancer is 98% estrogen positive,mildly differentiated.
    She goes back for another round of tests wensday since having chemo to see if its working and Im just really worried.She is like a mother to me and I want to be there to support her and just understand all I can.
    edit sorry i meant*the tumor in her breast is a Grade 2. The cells are somewhat abnormal (moderately differentiated).

    • ANSWER:
      I’m sorry about your aunt, but metastatic breast cancer is not curable, it can often be managed for several years though. She is getting the standard course of treatment and it looks like she is responding well if the tumors are shrinking. It is also good the tumor is moderately differentiated and ER positive, which means the tumor will likely respond to hormone therapy as well. She does have a long road ahead of her. She will still need a mastectomy, possibly more chemo and radiation, before hormone therapy. Best wishes to you both.

  29. QUESTION:
    A friend just diag. w/uterine cancer has to have 2-3 liters of fluid drained weekly. What’s happening?
    Uterine cancer (aggressivve),w/lesions on liver & lung. Beer-like fluid w/foamy head needs to be drained weekly. 2 to 3 liters each time.
    Whats going on?

    • ANSWER:
      Her ascites is probably caused by ‘seeding’ from her tumors . . the small nodules or cancer ‘seeds’ embed themselves into the lining of the soft tissue within the abdomen and cause an irritation. The response by the body is to produce fluid . . in excess .. which is the ascites.

      There is some treatment available for those with uterine cancer that have ascites that is done palliatively. It may cut down on the fluid. It’s called hyperthermic chemoperfusion and you can find literature about it at the National Library of Medicine:

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16437944

  30. QUESTION:
    TACE – in Liver Cancer?
    A women of 72 years, having liver cirrhosis and blood sugar, spleenomegaly, cholelithiasis, bronchitism, ashma having a lung capacity of less than 10% is now diagonised to have hepatoma, having 3.7 x 3 centimeters size space occupying exophytic lesion in the right lobe of the liver. Whether TACE is an effective treatment for this patient and what are the risks associated with this TACE treatment.

    • ANSWER:
      This should have been discussed with the oncologist when it was recommended. This is a part of the decision making process. TACE in this case is likely a palliative treatment and it is effective. There is risk of hemorrhage and developing an abscess which could be fatal.

  31. QUESTION:
    My mother has been diagnosed with cancer. Can that cause her toenails and feet to turn black?
    She has cancer in both lungs, both adrenal glands, 3 lesions on the liver, and a mass between her ribs. One of the masses has increased in size from 3 cm to 10.5 cm in ONE MONTH. She also has a small lump on her head. Could the feet turning black also be caused by the cancer? (like maybe in her bones or something?)

    • ANSWER:
      I do not know about the skin turning black but the link below may help with the cancer.

  32. QUESTION:
    Father has lesions in hip bone, spine, around heart, lungs, liver, gallbladder and chest cavity…?
    My father’s health has been going downhill for the last 6 months. It started with his kidney’s failing due to diabetes and he was doing pretty well until about a month or so ago. He’s been on dialysis for close to 6 months, and has been complaining of severe pain in his back and side.

    So, the doctors ran a few tests and I was aware of the lesions on his liver and gallbladder but was not aware of the ones on the other parts of his body. The doctors do not know if it is benign or malignant yet, and are trying to decide when to schedule him in for the biopsy. He had to be readmitted to the hospital last week due to the amount of pain and inability to walk.

    My question is:

    has this ever happened to you or anyone you known and it turned out to not be cancer? I don’t know what will happen if it is malignant because his health has degenerated so quickly. I’m trying to spend time with him every day, and I’m worried about what will happen in the next few months. Is there any way I can help prepare myself to help my father get through this?

    Any advice or comment is appreciated. Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      You need to speak to his doctors as they have all the information needed to answer you and we do not. It would be very unusual to not know if any of those sites are cancer are not and they are an unusual array for metastatic sites especially since you did not mention any lymph nodes unless that is what you mean by around the heart and chest cavity. I’m not sure why they didn’t do a biopsy when he was in the hospital.

  33. QUESTION:
    lesions on liver/non specific?
    Hx 5 year post Breast Ca.
    Recent dx nodule on lung and 2 leisions on liver. Dr note states “unable to rule ot mets at this time.”
    Can anyone tell me about leisons on the liver. What it could be, if NOT cancer? Dr is out of town.
    I need to know if they can be anything else so that I can get through the week without worrying quite as much.
    Dr did sign off on the staetement w/no addl instructions for follow up.
    Thanks Susan, it does help me breathe a bit easier. Thank you for sharing your experience.

    • ANSWER:
      Liver lesions could be cysts or other benign abnormalities. I had that, and no problem.
      You can have a biopsy done in order to know for sure.

  34. QUESTION:
    Please guide – liver cancer ?
    My father , 56 y, is suffering from Hep. B and is on Adefovir (Hepsera) , recently he had undergone MRI which reported as under :

    ” The study shows ultered signal intensity of lvier parenchyma. Focal Lesion measuring 24×21 mm is seen in Seg. 6 of right lobe of liver appearing Hypointense in T1W & hyperintense in T2WI with tiny hyper intense focus in T1WI. The lesion shows heterogenous enhancement post contrast study with small non-enhancing areas within. The intra hepatic biliary radicals are not dialated. The prota hepatis is normal, the spleen is normal ”

    The reports for other organs revealved normal except a small cyst on right kidney.

    IMP. THING 1m AGO ALSO HE HAD UNDERGONE A SONOGRAPHY WHICH REVEALED EVERYTHING IS NORMAL IN LIVER AND THE VIRAL COUNT FOR HEP. B WAS ALSO UNDER NORMAL RANGE. BUT IN 1m VIRAL COUNT HAS ALSO INCREASED TO 5.82 AND THE MRI REVEALED AS ABOVE.

    HIS CHILD PUGH SCORE IS 10.

    Pl. guide to go for transplant/rfapi and whether in 1m this can hap.

    • ANSWER:
      liver tumour or hepato-cellular carcinoma is grave thing to happen to someone. There are various modalities for treatment. including tumour resection , chemotherapy , laser ablation of tumour and percutaneous alcohol injections. your report indicates that it is still confined to one segment of liver which can be resected and you can achieve good 5 year survival rates. So u better hurry and show it to a good hepato-biliary surgeon to get desired results.

  35. QUESTION:
    found out i have a low density liver lesion???what is that?
    I been looking online to try and find out what this is and now im even more confused, things about cancer and Hepatitus keep popping up around my searches, im only 27! can liver lesions like this just be like not a problem< or are they an indicator of some serious problem always??Im freakin out here man!

    • ANSWER:
      I’m not a doctor….but I lost my wife last year to cancer…she was 24 when diagnosed, 41 when she passed away….eventually it moved into the liver, lungs, backbone, etc…..but don’t worry. Most people have lesions (hemangiomas) on their liver and don’t even know it and they are not neccesarily cancerous. High Density Lesions are what doctors seem to be most concerned about. Anything that is somewhat opaque or transparent (low density) usually do not cause concern. They are similar to a bruise or at least they show up that way on a CT scan or MRI. Did the doctor who diagnosed the lesion recommend doing a biopsy to see if they are malignant? Most doctors will take a wait and see approach. In 3 months time if the lesion has not grown any, changed shape or density, then most likely you are OK. You would know in that time, if there was a problem. If you lose a substantial amount of weight within 3 months (20-30 lbs) or get very weak and are tired all the time (can be caused from anemia)….I would see your doctor again. Bottom line….I would not worry, unless your doctor says you need to.

  36. QUESTION:
    What could a lesion on the liver be?
    I have a lesion on my liver.What could it be? What could cause this? I have pain under my right rib cage.Lower right side pain.And pain that runs from my vagina and my anus.Is this a sign of cancer?

    • ANSWER:
      Liver and Bowel cancer go hand in hand with each other, so have you had your bowel checked out?. It sounds like a cancer spot on your liver, but only a specialist is able to give you a correct diagnosis. The liver is the only organ that can grow back again, so if it is a cancer lesion they will operate and cut part of your liver away and allow it to grow back again. This is quite a big operation and it will tire you somewhat and you will look dreadful with dark rings around your eyes for about a month. Good luck anyway.

  37. QUESTION:
    In the anterior segment of the right lobe of the liver is a indeterminate 2.4cm high density lesion why?
    I had a ct scan on yesterday and the results were in the anterior segment oft eh right lobe of the liver
    there is an indeterminate 2.4 cm high density lesion could this mean cancer

    • ANSWER:

  38. QUESTION:
    Do we have a malpractice claim for the doctors lack of diagnosing my father with cancer sooner?
    My father had liver cancer 6 years ago. The surgeon removed the cancer w/surgery. Ever since then his PCP gives my dad CT scans to check for any growths/lesions/etc. every 6 months. Recently my dad went for a regular colonoscopy and they found a tumor & then determine he had a lesion on his liver. After a resectioning of the colon, they informed us that he has liver & colon cancer & is at Stage 4 & it has spread to his lymph nodes. Why didn’t they find this earlier with all the precautionary tests his PCP does?
    Just to add: my father was having a slew of complaints: (i.e. pain, pressure, tiredness, bowel movements probs). And also the oncologist stated that they could tell the “lesion” on his liver has been on my father’s scans for some time and at least the liver cancer was not that aggressive but now it is pushing on his diaphragm & is inoperable. (the oncologist has just recently reviewed my father’s records)

    • ANSWER:
      No. There is no malpractice here. It’s the cancer that is deceptive. It can hide out inside the body for an undetermined amount of time and than reoccur . .there is nothing that anyone can do except to remain constantly vigil . .and even than as you have discovered it can be too late. Reoccur cancer can move aggressively and very fast . . especially metastatic cancer . . your Dad always had these malignant cells sitting there . but no test could detect them until all of them grew at once . . and by than he is filled with cancer. That is why cancer is so feared.

      In answer to your specific question about why it was not found earlier . . because it was ‘unseen’ . .’microscopic’ . . there are no known tests that can detect microscopic cancer cells. With a CT the nodules or tumors need to be at least 1 -2 cm before they can be detected and that is only if you know where to look for them. Usually by the time they are seen . . there are many, many of them spread throughout the body . .all growing at the same rate . .and by than scans will detect them everywhere. This is also the reason that adjuvant chemotherapy is often offered . .to kill off residual disease that is lurking in the body . .sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. There is no cure for metastatic cancer . .only treatment . .but there is never any guarantee.

      Don’t blame the doctors. Blame the cancer.

  39. QUESTION:
    I went for a CT scan and the discovery of low attenuation lesion on liver is accidental.?
    In my CT scan, the report wrote that I have low attenuation lesion on liver and it stated that it is probably a perfusional anomaly. Can anyone tell me what does this mean? After the report was out, the doctor just sent me home and told me that I don’t have to come back again for any appointments. However, I tried searching on google about low attenuation lesion on liver and found out that several results stated that it might be linked to liver cancer. It may be malignant or benign. Should I contact my doctor?
    I am only 16 years old.

    • ANSWER:

  40. QUESTION:
    My mom has Type 4 Breast Cancer, and its spread to the spine and her liver. what does this mean?! please help
    my mom has always been really sick. they said that the “lesions” (or w/e technical term they called them) where very small on both her liver and spine. i’m just afraid shes not gna make it or its gonna go bad. and im trying to be positive… ALWAYS i am. but sometimes it passes through my head. i’m just so scared. she’s my mother….please help.

    • ANSWER:
      Lesions are small bits of cancer that have started a new breast cancer colony far away from the breast . . your mother has stage IV cancer which is referred to as Metastatic breast cancer. It is difficult to treat but not impossible . . much will depend on your mothers age, overall health, and response to treatment as well as the specific type of breast cancer, location of tumors, and how aggressive the disease turns out to be. There are also now treatments which prolong the life of the patient . .essentially allowing them to live with cancer . . although the goal is to get rid of it . . sometimes that is not possible . . there are other diseases which need medication to control the disease (like diabetes) and so the idea is to treat the cancer as a chronic disease and bring it under control with medication. In this process the hope is to prolong life while research continues for a ‘cure’. If this is what happens with your mother than she could be with you for quite a while . . there is no guarantee . .but it is possible and that is what you need to maintain hope for.

      There is still hope for your mom to respond to treatment . .lesions are small . . and if she can find the right chemotherapy or radiation to get rid of the ‘mets’ than she will be better off . . if not perhaps she will find a medication (targeted therapy or other treatment) that can be taken daily and she will learn to live with her cancer.

  41. QUESTION:
    Scarring of the liver and cirrhosis?
    My husband has just been informed that he has “slight scarring” on the liver and that his liver is enlarged. I have many questions regarding this, but PLEASE, I am looking for serious-minded answers, not for people telling me that he should stop drinking or other kinds of moralizing; it is hard enough as it is. First: the doctor said “there is slight scarring but no sign of cirrhosis”. I don’t quite understand this because I though scarring of the liver IS cirrhosis, although it might be at a very early stage in his case. Also, is an enlarged liver the same thing as fatty liver, or could there be other reasons for it being enlarged? Unfortunately, his main health issue is not the liver but advanced heart failure (severe dilated cardiomyopathy) and also COPD. He was told some years ago that he has Hepatitis C but then it was in a dormant state. Could his Hepatitis C have caused the scarring over time even if it has been in a dormant state? Also, when the scarring has started, is it bound continue? His doctor says that his liver is “working”, although I’m not sure whether she meant that it is working without any problems or working at a diminished capacity. I have done a lot of reading and it seems to me that he has many of the symptoms associated with acute liver failure: itching and small red lesions scattered over his body, a brief (one day) period of yellow skin and vomiting, periods of flu-like symptoms with fever, loss of appetite, severe sleep disturbances, clay-colored stool, brown urine, and his nails have turned very light. Also, he quit smoking, not because of his own determination but because he lost taste for cigarettes, which apparently is a sign of liver failure. He also bruise and bleed very easily, and he is easily fatigued. Many of these symptoms are of course also associated with heart disease, but it seems that they have become worse in the last couple of months. His bleeding and bruising can of course be caused by the heavy doses of coumadin he is on, but it seems that the bruising has gotten worse too. He is also getting easy confused and is becoming more and more forgetful. He is 60 years old. So, this is what I wonder: Can the heart disease and/or the COPD have caused the liver disease, or affect it negatively? And vice versa, what effect does the liver issue have on the heart disease and the COPD? His doctor wrote in the last report that there is no sign of ascites but he keeps saying that he feels very bloated and to me it seems like fluid, not fat. He often complain of discomfort in his lower right side and get winded very easily (also a sign of the heart disease, of course). How serious is this liver problem? If in fact he does have acute liver failure due to Hepatitis C, what is the outlook? I don’t believe liver transplant is an option in his case due to his advanced heart failure and generally poor condition. If it is left untreated and he continues to drink (he has at least 3 beers and usually a couple of shots of hard liquor per day. I am desperately trying to make him stop or seek help, but I am not able to), what is likely to happen? If scar tissue continues to build up in his liver, how dangerous is it and what kind of life expectancy does he have? Is it a matter of decades or years/months before his liver gives in completely? How do people with this kind of disease typically die, slowly by wasting away or suddenly? If it is not acute liver failure, what else could it be? Does the complications of Hepatitis C always come from cirrhosis/scarring caused by it, or can it cause symptoms independently without leading to cirrhosis? And is scarring always a sign of cirrhosis or can there be other reasons for it? If so, how likely is it that the scarring does lead to cirrhosis (unless it is the same disease just at different stages) How great is the risk of developing liver cancer? Is this risk increased because of his generally poor health or is it determined by other factors? Please, please, any information at all would be of great help. I know that all these questions should be directed to his doctor, but my husband refuses to let me meet her, and he himself seems to live in denial and doesn’t want to know anything about his disease. This is my reality, and any information you could provide would be gratefully accepted. Thankyou for reading all the way through this long question.

    • ANSWER:
      Lena, an alcoholic is THE most difficult of all patients to help, especially when you want to do so much. ALL that you describe is due to alcohol. At first alcohol causes liver cells to fill with fat and produce an enlarged fatty liver which alone has caused sudden death. In time, as liver cells die, scarring results and can then progress (under the microscope) to produce a smaller scarred liver called alcoholic cirrhosis. The liver then produces inadequate clotting factors which can produce skin and other hemorrhages, as well as leak fluid into the belly (ascites), and change blood circulation to overload and damage an eenlarging heart under strain as well as dilated, thin-walled esophageal veins (varices) which can anytime suddenly rupture as great quantities of blood are coughed up. Hepatitis c also damages the liver and is believed to be a cause of liver cancer. As long as your husband continues to drink alcohol, he will continue to go downhill and die in spite of your efforts. Try the phone book or call Al-Anon, an organization for spouses of alcoholics for much more information on how to deal with your extremely difficult situation. You cannot go it alone and expect and success.

  42. QUESTION:
    Making some sense out of my liver ultrasound results…?
    because my ALT was elevated (roughly 132)…I had an ultrasound done, please help make some sense out of the language…my doctor says it’s just a mild inflammation of the liver because there is too much fat in it (non-alcoholic):

    1. Liver is normal in size: if I had severe inflammation would my liver be enlarged?
    2. No focal or any lesions present: does this mean I have no tumors? Which means I don’t have liver cancer?
    3. Markedly echogenic shows that liver has gone through extensive fatty change: Pretty much means fatty liver I’m sure…

    Thanks it would be nice if someone could just clear this up for me if they know a lot about ultrasound results…THANKS!

    • ANSWER:
      It means that your liver is working overtime to clean out the blood. You can use a body cleanse which will help to lover the ALT levels and it won’t hurt the body – promise. You do not have to stop eating, just don’t eat junk (fast foods), more greens, veggies, salads are best (no creamy dressings; vingerattes are fine.) Try this website as I have ordered from him before and can vouch it’s safe.

  43. QUESTION:
    what is hype-attenuating lesions?
    I have a liver lesion and I was trying to find out what this was. I have had a CTA with contrast and a MRI with contrast and they said it was not cancer but I just wanted to know what I could do for this pain in my side. I have had my gallblader removed for several years now.

    • ANSWER:
      You are probably referring to hyperattenuating lesions in your liver? More than likely, your physician wanted the scans to rule out or confirm the presence of liver disease. Hyperattenuating lesions could indicate progression or presence of liver disease. It would be best to sit down with your internist and have him/her explain the diagnostic findings.

      Be careful about any advice given on Yahoo answers, no one can give you a good medical opinion without seeing the study results and knowing the full patient history.

  44. QUESTION:
    tumor found on liver, 2.5 years since…any cancer doctor or radiologist? plz comment?
    so I had pain in upper right part, they did US of abdomen/tyroid, seen a area of about 4cm on liver, US said unkown eitilogy, followed up with a CT, doc called said its a fatty liver after ct RESULTS came back but ordered a follow up in 3 months, did a followup US, they said its stable and likely fatty liver, doc suggested one more after 18 months and just got that done, are still remain 4.5cm with no new mass/lesions, however US says the area is LESS CONSPICUOUS this time, he said no more follow ups, pain happens still when eat something greasy/oily,
    do you guys think that a normal protocol of something like that?

    PS: very high cheost/high blood pressure, no other know diseases

    • ANSWER:
      Trust me as a Cancer survivor you just don’t wait. You need to see a new Oncologist as soon as possible. If it is Cancer, it has to be removed. Cancer “spreads”. I had it first when I was 24 and didn’t know it and had my first operation at age 25 and then at age 27 it was back and I had to have a completely hysterectomy. In 2006 it was back again and this time on my stomach and a piece of my liver. Recently I was diagnosed with two tumors (Cancerous) on my brain and am having surgery this month. The Dr’s have told me there is something causing my body to form these tumors and this time they promise to do as many tests as possible on tumors and DNA strands to try to figure it out.
      DO NOT waste time on a Dr. who wants to sit around and wait. PLEASE get a second opinion. If they feel it is a a fatty liver and safe I might still get a third opinion. I’ve had chemo and radiation three times and it isn’t worth it if you can avoid it by having surgery and getting it removed before the damage spreads.
      Sometimes Dr’s don’t have the time because they are spread too thin to pay the amount attention they need to to a patient. It is your responsibility to take your health care in your hands and do as much research as you can. Go the the American Cancer Website and they can hook you up with so much information you will be shocked..they’ve helped me 100 times over.
      Please don’t just take this Dr’s word. There is actually a blood test they can take to see if you have Cancer that your Dr. can order but that too is not totally reliable and you need to get a second opinion. Life is precious…you only get one. Good luck.
      Peace, Love & Happiness

  45. QUESTION:
    Sarcoidosis or cancer? Anyone been threw this?
    My doctors don’t know what is wrong with me. I have had about every blood test there is, and they are all normal. They first thought I might have breast cancer, that was spread due to a swollen lymph node in my neck. Ultra sound showed that the “mass” in my breast was also a lymph node, that was about 3cm. They said it wasn’t breast cancer, and blood tests ruled out lupus. So they sent me for a CT.

    The CT that shows over 100 enlarged lymph nodes. The largest one being in my abdomen, that is 8cm (a little over 3 inches). Swelling of the spleen, and liver and a small spot on my liver. Lesions in both lungs, one that is 8cm by 5 cm.
    It also showed something abnormal with a bone in my lower back on the right side. That my doctor says may either be a weak spot or something growing in the bone. So now I need an MRI to see what that is.

    And they are doing a biopsy of the lymph node in my right underarm. It is also massive in size, and they are going to remove the whole node.

    cont.
    They are still saying it may be lymphoma, and today said it may be sarcoidosis. My doctor said due to my age that he doesn’t believe it is lung cancer.

    Has anyone else had these symptoms. Including, night sweats, fevers, unexplained weight loss, and fatigue. And all the other things I have? If so what was it?
    I am just not sure what to do, I have been going for tests for 2 months now. And they still aren’t sure what it is.

    And the stress from all of this is driving me nuts. I have 5 kids to take care, 3 that are toddlers. And I am just so tired and worn out. And sick of doctors right now :(

    • ANSWER:
      My brother has sarcoidosis, and like you, it took a long time to get a diagnosis. My brother has it on his spleen but it can attack any organ of the body. Unfortunately the only way to diagnose sarcoidosis at the present time is by eliminating other diseases, like cancer. This is what my brother went through and unfortunately sounds like what you are going through. Here is some info.

      http://www.medicinenet.com/sarcoidosis/article.htm

      Good luck x

  46. QUESTION:
    Liver hemangioma vs Lesion question?
    OK I had a CT scan and since 05 i have had what i thought was a hemangioma, nw they are saying its not a hemangioma but a lesion, whats a lesion whats the difference between the two and the used a bunch of garbly words like it has isodense appearance, and homogenuis uptake11 by 18 mm’s in size and not cassic but can be seen in my age or somethng (Im 32 no female hormone use heavy cancer hustory in family and I do smoke) never had hepatitis or any of those diseases can a lesion become cancer, they said it was not when I asked also this is on the right lobe of my liver….. please tell me what all this means as much as ya can

    THANK YOU FOR ANY HELP AND INFO IN ADVANCE!! Please IM me if you can help me figure this out

    • ANSWER:
      The definition of a lesion covers all sorts of tissue abnormalities, so it could be anything that differs in appearance, compared to normal tissues. Its the words that go along with it that describe the nature of the lesion. Isodense means that the spots looks normal in an X-ray or MRI image. Classic (cassic?) lesions have distinct borders and are depressions (rather than bumps). Homogenious uptake means that the tissues in the lesion seem to function the same as surrounding tissue with regard to the substance that that was measured.

      Putting this altogether, it looks like you have a spot on your liver with no apparent effect. Its possible that you used to have a hemangioma that disappeared and left a small crater – this is common with hemangiomas. Most cancers that start as lesions do not begin as classic lesions.

  47. QUESTION:
    Recently found a lesion in the low left lob of my liver. Need to worry?
    I have not been feeling well for the past 5-7 months. After many question and answer appt’s with my Dr. I started having weekly blood tests to check various things. My erythrocyte sed rate and c-reactive protein were more than double the reference ranges. I also had abnormal liver function tests. After ultrasound I was told I had a lesion and needed a CT scan to determine whether or not it was something to worry about, which in fact I had done today. Although I have high hopes of benign findings I can’t help but factor in my constant sick feeling, flu like, pain when pressure is put on my abdomen and my grandmother passing from liver cancer. Anyone that can give me some helpful statistics would be greatly appreciated.
    No biopsy, as of yet.

    • ANSWER:
      The one thing I can say is : Do not put the carriage before the horse.
      Wait and let your tests get done, its a big worry but you can do it. Are they planning a biopsy ? Once you find out what it really is its hard to have a settled mind, I know , been there. But take things one day at a time. Always wish for for the best. And think to yourself, How strong am I ? Even if there was something, science and the medical field have come so far and the fact that you seem to have caught it in the early stages( because it has not taken over your kidney, only a lesion) then you will get through this with time, and with hope and with loved ones by your side. Be strong for you. I wish you only the best.

  48. QUESTION:
    Pressure on upper right abdominal area?
    I feel constant pressure /bloating feeling near my upper right abdominal area for almost 5 months now. I recently got an blood test for the Cea Ca-125 Alpha fetoprotein; they all came back negative. I also got an MRI that shows an unconfirmed report of liver lesions
    , they say I need a follow up until next month… Can liver lesion cause these symptoms or is it liver cancer? Also I got a gastroenterology test that says I have an small ulcer in my stomach with a inflammation. I am on omeprazole for 3 weeks, but the symptoms are still there. Whats wrong? Can this be liver cancer?
    Thanks, Also this pressure is relieved when I lay down? Why does this happen?

    • ANSWER:
      Naturally, as I am not a doctor, I can’t say it is or isn’t. You really do need to follow-up to find out and confirm the cause of the lesions of your liver.

      Just as a side note: my right upper quadrant was “bloated” and uncomfortable and I had either pressure like pain or stabbing pain in the URQ area with my gallbladder disease. If the doctors do rule out your liver as the cause for your abdominal pain, I suggest you get a HIDA scan w/ CCK done of the gallbladder (All my blood tests, Ultrasound with CCK, and CT scan were normal, the HIDA scan with CCK was the one test which gave me the answer I needed)

      I did do a little research and it says that most liver lesions do not cause abdominal pain. However, the fact that you alpha-fetoprotein levels are normal is a good sign since it can be elevated with liver cancer.

      I wish you the best of luck in finding out what this is and I hope you feel better soon!!

      ***********************************
      Liver Cancer

      What are the symptoms of liver cancer?

      The initial symptoms (the clinical presentations) of liver cancer are variable. In countries where liver cancer is very common, the cancer generally is discovered at a very advanced stage of disease for several reasons. For one thing, areas where there is a high frequency of liver cancer are generally developing countries where access to healthcare is limited. For another, screening examinations for patients at risk for developing liver cancer are not available in these areas. In addition, patients from these regions actually have more aggressive liver cancer disease. In other words, the tumor usually reaches an advanced stage and causes symptoms more rapidly. In contrast, patients in areas of low liver cancer frequency tend to have liver cancer tumors that progress more slowly and, therefore, remain without symptoms longer.

      Abdominal pain is the most common symptom of liver cancer and usually signifies a very large tumor or widespread involvement of the liver. Additionally, unexplained weight loss or unexplained fevers are warning signs of liver cancer in patients with cirrhosis. These symptoms are less common in individuals with liver cancer in the U.S. because these patients are usually diagnosed at an earlier stage. However, whenever the overall health of a patient with cirrhosis deteriorates, every effort should be made to look for liver cancer.

      A very common initial presentation of liver cancer in a patient with compensated cirrhosis (no complications of liver disease) is the sudden onset of a complication. For example, the sudden appearance of ascites (abdominal fluid and swelling), jaundice (yellow color of the skin), or muscle wasting without causative (precipitating) factors (for example, alcohol consumption) suggests the possibility of liver cancer. What’s more, the cancer can invade and block the portal vein (a large vein that brings blood to the liver from the intestine and spleen). When this happens, the blood will travel paths of less resistance, such as through esophageal veins. This causes increased pressure in these veins, which results in dilated (widened) veins called esophageal varices. The patient then is at risk for hemorrhage from the rupture of the varices into the gastrointestinal tract. Rarely, the cancer itself can rupture and bleed into the abdominal cavity, resulting in bloody ascites.

  49. QUESTION:
    focal fatty infiltration of liver?
    I recently had an CT scan that showed “Focal Fatty infiltration is noted adjacent to the ffissure for the falciform ligament, and the liver.” Can anyone tell me what that means. I have tried to look via the net to find out info about it and it does not tell me anything. My family has a history of liver disease including my father who did have liver disease and my grandfather who had cancer of the liver. My grandmother had some lesions removed from her liver. I was wondering if this is something that I need to be worried about. Or what are some types of treatment for this. I have had numberous abdominal surgeries and have also had an cholecystectomy done.

    • ANSWER:

  50. QUESTION:
    Kidney cancer spreading to lungs?
    I have a large tumor in one kidney, and my doctor says there is a 70% chance it is malignant. On a chest X-ray, he saw some “lesions” in my lungs and has now ordered a CT scan of my chest. But my primary doctor had already detected the lesions in my lungs and said they were scar tissue.

    How likely is it that the cancer has spread to my lungs? My liver, colon, stomach, other kidney and organs have been checked and have no tumors.

    Thanks!

    • ANSWER:
      Renal (kidney) cancers can spread to the lungs, but this speculation is not very helpful. I would need to see the “large tumor” in one kidney which must have shown up on x-ray studies, and I would need to see the Chest X-rays your primary doc thinks show only scar tissue. Even then, it would be speculation. That is why you are having a CT scan of the chest.
      None of these questions can be answered without a tissue biopsy which I assume will be the next step. We cannot diagnose cancers with x-ray studies alone. We must get biopsy tissue and look at them under the microscope.
      Your concern is understandable, but no one can tell you from this distance. Best of Luck that this all turns out on the good side.